MARQUETTE GAA

The Gaelic Games on the North Shore

Irish Whitetail Gaelic Athletic Club

The Upper Peninsula has a rich heritage of immigration. Through the mines, logging camps, and fisheries across the land; many Irish came to call the area home. Many of which came from Beaver Island after the fishing stock could no longer support their families. Joining other European immigrants, they turned the Upper Peninsula into a truly unique melting pot of cultures that helped build the nostalgia of the "Yooper".

Irish Whitetail Gaelic Athletic Club - Marquette GAA was founded in partnership with Irish Whitetail Distillery to promote the Irish culture that is intrinsic to the area. Marquette GAA's goal is to instruct players of all ages in the ancient Gaelic games of Football, Hurling, and Camogie. The club will be a member of the USGAA Heartland Division, and compete against clubs in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, and Missouri. Club competition includes the Fox River Hurling Club, Indianapolis GAA, Kansas City GAC, Hurling Club of Madison, Miltown Gaels, Milwaukee Hurling Club, Naperville Hurling Club, St. Louis GAC, Twin Cities GFC, and Robert Emmets Hurling. The club will further take part in various tournaments throughout the year to challenge both youth and senior players. 

All instruction of players is in line with the GAA player development program and will have opportunities for players as young as 4 years old to take part. 

Senior competition or travel teams will be made up of individuals from both the Senior and Junior levels to line out the best 15 man team available.

Learn more about the club and the latest updates by following the club page at Facebook.com/MarquetteGAA  

The Club will train and play in the Marquette area and the training pitch will be announced in the near future.

Rules of Hurling

The Basics of Hurling

This summary is brought to you by the Milwaukee Hurling Club



This section describes the basic rules of the game of hurling. 

Teams
1. A game of hurling is played by two teams. Each team is comprised of up to 15 field players and added substitutions.
2. The player breakdown is as follows:

1 Goalkeeper

6 Defensive Players

2 Mid-Field Players

6 Offensive Players

3. Players pair up with their opposite marks. 

Game Play
1. A game or match usually consists of two halves of 25-35 minutes.
2. The sliotar (ball) cannot be picked up from the ground directly with the hand. The hurley must    be used to roll, jab, lift or flick the sliothar into the hand.
3. The sliotar can be caught while in the air or bouncing along the ground.
4. The sliotar can be transferred to the hand at most twice. If the sliotar touches the ground, the count is reset.
5. The sliotar can be hit with the hurley on the ground or in the air.
6. The sliotar can also be kicked or hand passed, using one hand for the entire movement. The sliotar cannot be thrown.
7. The sliotar can be kept in the hand for at most 4 consecutive steps or the length of time to take 4 steps.
8. The sliotar can be balanced on the stick for an unlimited time.

Fouls
1. Touching the sliotar directly with a hand while it is on the ground.
2. Overplaying the sliotar by catching it more than twice with the hand or running for more than four steps while in the hand.
3. Physically challenging a player while the sliotar is not present (off the ball challenge) or by playing in an aggressive and illegal manner.
4. A player may not grab or hold another player's hurley.


Physical Contact
1. Hurling is a physical game and a certain amount of contact is permitted, provided it is in attempting to gain possession of the sliotar.
2. A fair shoulder charge is permitted.

Scoring
1. A point is scored when the sliotar is hit over the crossbar, which is above the goal keeper, and between the goal posts.
2. A goal is scored when the sliothar is hit under the cross bar and into the goal between the goal posts. A goal is worth 3 points.
3. Goals and points can be scored from play or from 'set pieces' such as a free or a side line cut.


Essential Skills
1. Picking up the sliotar via rolling the sliothar with the hurley into the hand (roll lift) or by using the hurley to scoop the sliotar into the hand (jab lift).
2. Balancing and running with the sliothar on the hurley (solo run).
3. Striking the sliotar with the hurley on the ground (ground pull or hurl) and by tossing the sliotar into the air and striking it.
4. Striking the sliotar while moving on the ground or in the air (doubling on the sliothar).
5. Free Taking: Picking the sliotar from the ground and striking it in one movement without handling the sliotar.
6. Sideline cut: Chipping the sliotar from the ground when it goes over a sideline.
7. Fielding the sliotar by catching it in the air.
8. Blocking a shot is when a player uses his/her hurley to prevent another player from striking the sliotar. This tackle must be done from in front of the striker as they are tossing the sliotar into the air.
9. 'Hooking' is a skill where a player uses his/her hurley to prevent another player from striking the sliotar. This is done from behind the striker and his/her hurley must be intercepted as the striking motion is taking place.

The Basics of Football

This section describes the basic rules of the game of football.  For a complete .pdf of the official rules, please visit the GAA online.  


Teams
1. A game of hurling is played by two teams. Each team is comprised of up to 15 field players and added substitutions.
2. The player breakdown is as follows:

1 Goalkeeper

6 Defensive Players

2 Mid-Field Players

6 Offensive Players

3. Players pair up with their opposite marks. 

Game Play
1. A game or match usually consists of two halves of 25-35 minutes.
2. The ball cannot be picked up from the ground directly with the hands. The boot (cleats) must  be used to kick or lift the ball into the hands. (Women's Football may pick up from the ground).
3. The ball can be caught while in the air or bouncing along the ground.
4. The ball can be carried for four steps before one must solo (bounce off the toe of boot) or hop (bounce off the ground). A payer cannot hop the ball more than once in a row.
5. The ball can be kicked while on the ground or drop kicked.
6. The ball can also be kicked to a teammate or hand passed using a volleyball style punch. The ball cannot be thrown.
7. The ball can be moved in any direction. 
8. The ball is brought back into play by a kick or hand pass.

Fouls
1. Picking up the ball directly with the hands while it is on the ground.
2. Overplaying the ball by running for more than four steps while in the hand or hopping the ball more than one time in a row.
3. Physically challenging a player while the ball is not present (off the ball challenge) or by playing in an aggressive and illegal manner.
4. A player may not grab, hold, or pull another player, but can block the ball to gain possession.


Physical Contact
1. Football is a physical game and a certain amount of contact is permitted, provided it is in attempting to gain possession of the ball and not separate the opponent from it as in Hockey, American Football, or Rugby.
2. A fair shoulder charge is permitted.

Scoring
1. A point is scored when the ball is punched or kicked over the crossbar, which is above the goal keeper, and between the goal posts.
2. A goal is scored when the ball is punched or kicked under the cross bar and into the goal between the goal posts. A goal is worth 3 points.
3. Goals and points can be scored from play or from 'set pieces' such as a free kick or penalty.


Essential Skills
1. Kicking the ball into the hand.
2. Kicking the ball off the toe of the boot while running (soloing).
3. Kicking the ball in a controlled manner to a teammate.
4. Striking the ball to a teammate from the hand.
5. Free Taking: Kicking the ball from the ground over the bar for a point or directing it to a teammate.
6. Challenging for the ball in the air and catching the ball.
7. Running across the pitch for extended periods of time.
8. Blocking a shot by using forearms to prevent opposing player from kicking or passing the ball. This tackle must be done from in front of the kicker or from the side.
9. Marking their assigned opponent by defending their positions on the pitch.

GAA FIELD OF PLAY

Pitch Dimensions

The field of play for Gaelic Games is rectangular and its dimensions are as follows:

Length - 130m minimum to 145m maximum
Width - 80m minimum to 90m maximum
Pitch Markings

At distances of 13m, 20m, 45m (football) and 65m (hurling), lines are marked parallel to the end lines. The intersection of these lines and the end lines with the sidelines are marked with flags.

The midline of the field is marked parallel to the end lines and has a maximum length of 10m
(Note: the dimensions may be reduced by local bye-laws for U15 or younger grades).

Goalmouth and Scoring Space

The scoring space is marked in the centre of each end line by two goalposts 6.5m apart, with a height of not less than 7m above ground level. A cross bar is fixed to the goal posts at a height of 2.5m above the ground (Note: goalpost dimensions may be reduced by local bye-laws for U15 or younger grades).

Two rectangles of the following dimensions are formed in front of each set of goalposts.
A) Small Rectangle
14m long by 4.5m wide. The distance from the inside of each goalpost to the beginning of each line of width is 3.75m

B) Large Rectangle
19m long by 13m wide. The distance from the inside of each goalpost to the beginning of each line of width is 6.25m

Substitution Zone and Semi Circle Arc

A semi circle arc of 13m radius, centred on the mid-spot of the 20m line, is marked outside of each 20m line




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